Clothing for Victorian dogs

Gabriel Navar:

Victorian fashion for dogs!

Originally posted on The Pet Historian:

crochet jacket for a greyhound Godeys 86 5 May 1873 p 453  In May 1873, Godey’s Lady’s Book, the most famous women’s magazine in nineteenth century America, published instructions on how to make this crocheted coat for a small dog.  The fashion victim illustrated in the wood engraving of the result of this home craft project is an Italian greyhound, who would certainly have needed a coat like this in an unevenly heated American house. As I recall, the pattern calls for red and blue wool yarn.  The coat also had small bells for buttons, so the dog would jingle as he trotted along.  Collars for small house dogs often had bells, too.

I thought about other household animals that had to wear bells.  By the late nineteenth century, house cats sometimes had belled collars to neutralize their effectiveness as hunters.  This may have been associated with increased public interest in song bird protection.  Horses sometimes had belled harnesses; I…

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Upcoming Art Exhibit

Upcoming Exhibition(s)

San Pablo City Gallery

Ubiquitous World of Small Screens” work by Gabriel Navar & Byron Spicer. Exhibition runs from November 1 – 30, 2014. Reception November 8, 2014.Cow and Frame Camptime San Pablo Art Gallery Exhibit Frida Kahlo Ronald McDonald Clown

What: Two-Person Art Exhibition

Title: “Ubiquitous World of Small Screens, Paintings by Gabriel Navar, Byron Spicer”

Where: San Pablo Art Gallery, 13831 San Pablo Ave, Maple Hall, Bldg 4, San Pablo, CA 94806
http://www.sanpabloca.gov/artgallery ; Gallery Hours: Sat & Sun, 12 – 4pm
Contact: Anne Austin, 510.882.8673

When: November 1 – 30, 2014.
Artist Reception: Saturday, November 8, 1 – 3 pm, Free and Open to the Public

“In Navar’s paintings that he has been working on for the last few years, he has been inspired by the internet platform as a way of investigating relevant current events as well as the human condition as it relates to and is tightly interwoven with our inner, cyber, natural and urban landscapes. His paintings are a critique as well as an assimilation and celebration of the multiplicity and disparate abundance of visual information often intended to side-track, seduce and/or sell something to the public. His work is based on the visual realm of popular and often infamous imagery that permeates our social consciousness through the media, especially the internet (specifically youtube.com). He has been, over the years, intrigued, amused and informed by the phenomena of youtube, apps and, most recently, “selfies”. These techno-gadget-oriented “arenas” have been fodder for him through a creative lens for many years.”

Dr. Jose Rodeiro
Professor of Art and Art History, New Jersey City College, New Jersey

Byron Spicer was born and raised in San Francisco during the 1960’s and 70’s. Growing up in the media age and in a city known for its diversity, his paintings celebrate a world of many voices and encourage active and imaginative interpretation. Spicer’s works are created using a distinctive technique involving the application of acrylic paint to small sections of acid free paper and wood panel, employing color and imperfect lines to create something immediate and essential. Despite themes and imagery that may initially appear childlike, Spicer’s work invited viewers to take a deeper look at what joy means in their own lives.”

David Huff, 
Exhibitions & Programs Coordinator/Curator Pro Arts Gallery, Oakland CA